PRESERVING YOUR INDIE FILMS AT THE PROVINCIAL ARCHIVES

Information Seminar - FREE!
Date: 
Saturday, October 28, 2017 -
11:00am to 4:00pm
Fee: 
Film Co-op Members: 
$0.00
Non-Members: 
$0.00
Class Limit: 
20
Instructor: 
Joanna Aiton Kerr
Location: 
Provincial Archives of New Brunswick Exhibit Room
23 Dineen Drive
Fredericton , NB
Canada
New Brunswick
Workshop Description: 

Once a film has completed its festival run and been streamed on YouTube, filmmakers are often unsure what to do with the film to ensure its long term preservation. Due to the unstable nature of digital records and the ever changing landscape of technology, if filmmakers are not proactive in preservation valuable information may be lost. The Provincial Archives of New Brunswick is mandated “to discover, collect and preserve records having any bearing upon the history of New Brunswick” (Archives Act) and is currently working with the NBFC to ensure the history independent film community is preserved and made available for researchers for years to come.

At this session, you will learn about how the Archives works, how you can donate materials, what sort of materials you can donate, and how you can receive a tax receipt for your donations. Also learn about copyright laws, your right to privacy, retaining ownership of your film after making a donation, and ask any questions you may have on the process. You will also be given a short tour of the Archives including the Audio/Visual Lab, the Conservation Lab, and the Repository where the records are stored.

We will also be screening some Film Co-op short films currently stored in the PANB vault including The Vacationers, The Man Who Skied Citadel Hill, and Smoke.

Instructor's Biography: 
Joanna Aiton Kerr is the Manager of Services and Private Sector Records at the Provincial Archives of New Brunswick. A graduate of the Masters of Archival Studies program at the University of British Columbia, Joanna has held various positions in the archives field, including Congregational Archivist for the Sisters of Charity of Saint Vincent de Paul in Halifax, and University Records Manager for the University of New Brunswick. She is the past-president of the Council of Archives New Brunswick. Joanna lives in Fredericton with her husband, two daughters, two dogs and a cat. Established in 1967, the Provincial Archives of New Brunswick collects and preserves the documents of the people, institutions and government of the province. Most of the holdings are for the period from 1784, when New Brunswick was made a separate province of British North America. However, some materials relating to the earlier exploration, Acadian and pre-Loyalist periods have also been acquired. Under provincial legislation the Archives has responsibility to assemble, and to make available for research, records bearing upon the history of New Brunswick. The Records Management Program ensures the regular transfer and archival retention of all non-current government records that have permanent legal and historical value. The records of individuals, churches, businesses and associations are acquired through donation of original material, and loans for copying. The documents in the Archives are provincial treasures. Many are fundamental in protecting the rights and interests of the people, or are essential for understanding and preserving our heritage and culture. Materials which are not in archives, particularly those in danger of being lost or destroyed, should be brought to the attention of the Archives staff.